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Homes for Sale in Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC

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Buying or selling a home is a big deal. When it comes to making one of the largest financial decisions in your life, it's crucial to have a trusted advisor by your side. Someone who does what is best for you and your family, listens to your needs and does everything possible to help you achieve your goals. While most home buyers and sellers crave the same guidance from their real estate professionals, their specific real estate needs will always be different.

If you have been looking for a real estate agent who understands the delicate balance between the two, look no further than Hillary Jones. With more than 15 years of real estate experience under her belt, Hillary brings a unique set of client-centric skills to the table. Unlike some big box firms out there, Hillary provides personalized, one-on-one real estate services to all her clients. This boutique approach lets Hillary spend more time with clients, whether it's giving a house tour or finding the hidden gem of their dreams.

Hillary takes pride in knowing Salisbury Acres, SC neighborhoods like the back of her hand, from new homes for sale in Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC to secluded riverfront properties off the beaten path. She will work closely with you to discover the exact type of home you're interested in buying while always considering your budget.

Why do so many home buyers trust Hillary? She knows that the most important real estate transaction is yours. As such, she works tirelessly to exceed expectations.

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Here are just a few more reasons why real estate clients trust Hillary Jones:

  • 15+ Years of Real Estate Experience
  • Always Working for Your Best Interests
  • Expert Negotiator
  • Loyal, Confident, and Capable
  • Always Accessible Via Email or Phone
  • Always Up to Date on Market Trends and What They Mean to You
  • Expert at Writing Strong, Enforceable Contracts
  • Well Connected
  • Access to Many Homes for Sale in Dozens of Neighborhoods
  • Stress-Free Service: You've Got Enough on Your Plate!
  • Available Every Step of the Way, Even After Closing
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Peaceful Living

Community designers chose to focus on a peaceful community atmosphere when creating this neighborhood. Homes are not stacked on top of one another but are also close enough to create a sense of community. Here, residents live, work, play, and gather while never being too far away from major thoroughfares. The neighborhood's layout helps reduce on-road traffic, encouraging alternative methods of travel like walking and biking.

The community plan sidewalks and beautiful spaces for residents to enjoy, creating meaningful ties to Mother Nature. With gorgeous walking and biking trails nearby, residents have the chance to enjoy natural features without having to travel to a national park.

If living close to nature in a community-based environment sounds like the perfect place to live, Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC should be high on your list.

Schools

 First Time Home Buyer Salisbury Acres, SC

Schooling is important to the residents of Summerville, SC, with the community being close to many of the area's highest-ranking K-12 schools. If you have younger children, you will love the local education system and pre-K options for younger kids. Local high schools are also great, and feature many course options with purpose-driven curriculums and over-achieving teachers. During your tour of this Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC, be sure to ask Hillary Jones about the elementary, middle, and high school options for learning.

Crime Rate

 Real Estate Agent Salisbury Acres, SC

Crime is always a factor no matter where you live, but if you're concerned about criminal activity in this Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC, you don't have much to worry about. Recent statistics show that Summerville, SC has lower crime rates than other cities in South Carolina. That is great news if you're looking to buy a home in the next year, especially if you have younger children. If you're looking for a peaceful place to live with excellent nearby schools and lower than average crime rates, look no further than this popular neighborhood in Summerville, SC.

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Homes for Sale Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC

Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC is a well-established neighborhood nestled in Summerville, SC - one of the most popular cities to live and play in in South Carolina. After spending some time in this gorgeous community, you will get a true sense of comfort and belonging here. You get the feeling that everything is well looked after and that residents are happy - because both are true.

in Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC was designed to give residents access to everything they could want or need without driving all over Summerville, SC. Located a short driving distance from the highway, Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC features unique recreation opportunities, shopping, top-ranked schools, and even healthcare, all within driving distance of the neighborhood. Community developers created the layout of this neighborhood in Summerville, SC with convenience and comfort in mind. When you live here, you can enjoy an abundance of trees, shrubs, walking trails, well-lit streets, and more.

A few reasons why home buyers put Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC at the top of their lists include:

The Trail System

Designed for families and their children to get outside and play, in Summerville, SC trail system winds its way throughout the neighborhood, giving residents an easy way to get out and get exercise. Kids love to explore these trails, and parents love to let them get a break from sitting in front of their iPad all day. Adults enjoy the trails too, and use them for walking with friends, running, or simply meandering through Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC.

Sense of Community

The Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC designers wanted to give residents plenty of room to "stretch out" while also creating a palpable sense of community. So, you won't have to walk a mile in the snow to get a cup of sugar from your neighbor. On the other hand, residents and their lots are well-spaced apart, maintaining privacy. Residents in the Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC neighborhood are close-knit, and very welcoming to new homeowners. If you have children, you should set up a date and time to tour Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC with Hillary Jones, who can point out popular features and home plans.

Summerville, SC YMCA

One of the most sought-after amenities Summerville, SC is the family YMCA. This massive complex was created to give local residents a fun, easy way to enjoy recreation with friends and family. Features include modern exercise equipment, walking tracks, tennis and basketball courts, a softball field, an aquatics complex, and even wellness and health programs. Sign your child up for Summerville, SC camp, or even try learning a new sport to keep you active on the weekends!

Healthcare

Healthcare

Access to healthcare options in Summerville, SC is plentiful and located within a few miles' drive. Healthcare providers include:

  • Primary Care Options
  • Orthodontic Practices
  • Family Dentistry Offices
  • Chiropractic and Massage Therapists
  • Assisted Living Facilities
  • Eye Care Centers

Shopping

Shopping

One of the biggest reasons why so many home buyers settle on Summerville, SC is the extensive access to shops and services, all located just a short drive from the neighborhood.

Shopping and convenience options include:

  • Popular grocery store chains
  • Restaurants offering breakfast, lunch, and dinner options from names like Starbucks and Chick-Fil-A, and more.
  • Gas stations and convenience stores for re-fueling and quick snacks.
  • Personal services like nail salons and spas for relaxation.
  • Financial services for taxes and investing.
  • Preschool and childcare options for families.

Real Estate
in Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC

Awarded "Best Community" by Summerville, SC Choice Awards, Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC is located where 53,000 acres of land have been placed under density restriction. If you're looking for a neighborhood with a secluded feel that is close to nature but also nearby the conveniences of modern life, you're in luck. Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC offers restaurants, shops, and entertainment options nearby, and should be on your list of communities to tour with Hillary Jones. Unlike many newer neighborhoods, Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC does not have a "cookie cutter" feel at all. Instead of congested sidewalks and small lots, Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC boasts plenty of room to live and a variety of floor plan options.

Homebuyers choose Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC for many reasons, including:

 Foreclosure Salisbury Acres, SC

1.

Family-Friendly

One of the most cited reasons for moving to Salisbury Acres neighborhood in Summerville, SC is the fact that it is family friendly. Here, kids love to gather outdoors and play, socialize, and make new friends that last for a lifetime. This neighborhood's family-friendly atmosphere makes carpooling easy, especially if your kids are in children's programs with neighbors. Expect warm smiles and hearty hugs when you move here, as the current residents are very friendly and welcoming. If you don't currently have kids but want to start a family in the future, this neighborhood in Summerville, SC is a fantastic place to raise a child.

 Listing Agent Salisbury Acres, SC

2.

Outdoor Activities

If you love to soak up the sun and spend your free time in the great outdoors instead of cooped up inside, this neighborhood in Summerville, SC is a great choice. Whether you want an easy-to-find walking trail for a leisurely stroll a wooded hiking trail, you can find plenty of options close by. If you would rather hit the gym over walking or running, you can choose from several gyms in the local area. If you don't feel like driving a short way's away, you can always take a nice walk around this gorgeous neighborhood in Summerville, SC. When you live here, you will have easy access to many outdoor activities, all within a short driving distance.

Some local outdoor activity options include:

  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Walking
  • Fishing
  • Swimming
  • Camping
  • More
Buy A Home Salisbury Acres, SC

3.

Schools

Perhaps the most cited reason for buying a home in Summerville, SC is the unique access to schools. Whether your child is just getting started in the school system or is a junior in high school, the education programs in Summerville, SC are excellent. Ranked among some of the best schools in the state, there are options for pre-K students all the way up to high schoolers. Students that attend school in Summerville, SC love the teachers, their fellow students, the classes offered, and the after-school activities to advance their sports skills and education.

Many parents choose to enroll their kids in the Dorchester 2 school district, which has received acclaim as one of the best school districts available.

 Buyers Home Seller Salisbury Acres, SC

Find Your Forever Home
with Hillary Jones

If you are thinking about buying real estate in Summerville, SC, we would like to invite you to our office and welcome you to our community. As a local for nearly two decades, Hillary Jones knows the Lowcountry like the back of her hand. From local market knowledge to contract negotiations, Hillary is committed to unmatched real estate excellence. It doesn't matter if you have a few questions or are ready to buy your dream home - if quality real estate service is what you need, you will find it here.

Everyone knows the home buying process can be challenging, but as your advocate, your experience will be seamless and stress-free. Give our office in Summerville, SC, a call today to learn more about how Hillary puts the "real" back in real estate.

Homes-for-Sale-phone-number 843-709-4666

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Latest News in Salisbury Acres, SC

Developer planning 379-acre industrial park on Long Ferry Road

SALISBURY — Jacqui Smith Watson knew it was only a matter of time before another major development came to Long Ferry Road in northeast Rowan County.“Our exit is one of the last exits they haven’t built something this huge at,” Watson said. “I knew it was coming.”She was still shocked several weeks ago when she learned of the magnitude of a project currently being planned by Red Rock Developments.The company, which is based in Columbia, South Carolina, and has a regio...

SALISBURY — Jacqui Smith Watson knew it was only a matter of time before another major development came to Long Ferry Road in northeast Rowan County.

“Our exit is one of the last exits they haven’t built something this huge at,” Watson said. “I knew it was coming.”

She was still shocked several weeks ago when she learned of the magnitude of a project currently being planned by Red Rock Developments.

The company, which is based in Columbia, South Carolina, and has a regional office in Charlotte, plans to develop a 379-acre industrial park with 2.65 million square feet of commercial space spread across six buildings. The industrial park will be located about a mile off I-85 at exit 81, not far from Chewy’s e-commerce fulfillment center.

The largest building in the park will be almost 1.2 million square feet alone, considerably larger than Chewy’s 700,000 square foot facility. The other five buildings range in size from 168,480 square feet to 572,113 square feet, according to a site plan.

The second-largest building will be constructed north of Long Ferry Road while the rest will be south of the road. In addition to several water retention ponds and interior access roads, site plans call for 1,149 parking spaces and 723 trailer spaces. The buildings will be built speculatively, which typically means the developer will try to attract a tenant during or shortly after construction.

Red Rock Developments showcased plans to nearby residents at a community meeting held at Millers Ferry Fire Department Tuesday evening.

Watson, a longtime Long Ferry Road resident, attended the gathering after hearing about the potential development on a Facebook group several weeks prior. She said the meeting was well attended and that residents were engaged. Most people were concerned about traffic on Long Ferry Road. Rowan County Commissioners Chair Greg Edds, who also attended the meeting, shared a similar assessment.

“The biggest issue asked among everybody, whether they supported it or didn’t, was the issue of traffic,” Edds said. “We’ve dealt with that to some extent with the Chewy project. That’s a question that everyone had, even if you were very enthusiastic about the project.”

Edds added most residents seemed to be supportive of plans for the industrial park.

Watson said there is already a law enforcement officer stationed near the I-85 interchange to help direct traffic around 5 p.m. everyday. In addition to Chewy, two gas stations at the exit draw traffic.

Due to the amount of additional traffic the industrial park would bring to Long Ferry Road, Red Rock Developments initiated a traffic impact analysis and generated recommendations to improve the road accordingly. Those recommendations were reviewed and approved by the North Carolina Department of Transportation.

Recommendations include adding turn lanes at access points to the industrial park along Long Ferry Road, but they do not include any new travel lanes to the two-lane road. There will be about nine access points to different portions of the industrial park.

The majority of road improvements will happen near the I-85 interchange, according to NCDOT District Engineer Kelly Seitz.

Seitz said a traffic signal will be put at the southbound and northbound ramps at exit 81. Another signal will be added at the service road leading to Chewy.

Edds said Rowan County will conduct a corridor study on Long Ferry Road to examine the road extending past the proposed industrial park.

Besides traffic, Watson doesn’t have many concerns about the facility.

“I would hope it would increase property values and not inconvenience too many people with the traffic coming in and out of that project,” Watson said.

Rick Mahaley, who lives on Long Ferry Road across from what is being called “building E,” also said he didn’t have any major concerns besides traffic.

“I’m definitely not put out or upset, other than it’s going to ruin my view and change what I’ve been used to,” Mahaley said.

Mahaley said he might have concerns about light or noise pollution, depending on what type of companies end up inhabiting the buildings in the industrial park. Progress is inevitable, Mahaley said, and people generally have the right to do what they want with their land.

Now that Red Rock Developments has hosted a community meeting, the company is primed to move forward with its plans. One of the next steps will be to rezone the parcels that comprise the park. Edds said county government is working with the company to determine the best way to do that and the two entities have been in frequent communication.

“They’re one of the best groups we’ve ever dealt with,” Edds said.

The industrial park would be connected to the county’s northeast water system, but sewer lines would need to be extended from Chewy’s facility. A separate water line also would need to be added for fire safety.

Edds said bringing economic development to Long Ferry Road has been on his mind since he was elected as a commissioner almost a decade ago.

“I’ve always been excited about the possibility of something happening out there,” Edds said.

He’s bullish on what the industrial park would mean for Rowan County.

“Just the value of the shell of these buildings approaches about $200 million,” Edds said. “But what we see when companies come along, if you look at some of the other projects we’re looking at, the equipment that goes in there is oftentimes a much higher investment than what the building itself is even. We could safely say that you could probably double that amount in total investment.”

Edds said he’s also excited about the number of jobs the park would create, which he expects to be more than 1,000.

“That continues to raise the boats because they have to compete for workers and it raises everybody’s boat,” Edds said.

About Ben Stansell

Ben Stansell covers business, county government and more for the Salisbury Post. He joined the staff in August 2020 after graduating from the University of Alabama. Email him at ben.stansell@salisburypost.com.

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NC Food Innovation Lab launches on NC Research Campus

KANNAPOLIS – Complete with state-of-the-art equipment and a goal of serving as a catalyst for the development of plant-based food, the N.C. Food Innovation Lab was launched Thursday with a celebratory ribbon-cutting and open house.The 16,000-square-foot food processing and product development facility is on the 350-acre N.C. Research Campus. It represents almost an $11 million investment, said Bill Aimutis of the food lab.The lab includes a wet processing area for plant material and water removal; a room...

KANNAPOLIS – Complete with state-of-the-art equipment and a goal of serving as a catalyst for the development of plant-based food, the N.C. Food Innovation Lab was launched Thursday with a celebratory ribbon-cutting and open house.

The 16,000-square-foot food processing and product development facility is on the 350-acre N.C. Research Campus. It represents almost an $11 million investment, said Bill Aimutis of the food lab.

The lab includes a wet processing area for plant material and water removal; a room for extrusion, milling and blending; an extraction room for plant-based raw materials; a drying room; product development lab; test kitchen; and collaboration studio.

The open house started with remarks from multiple North Carolina officials and those affiliated with the project.

“What a special day this is, and what a special facility this is,” N.C. Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler said. “We’re going to be creating markets for farmers and will be creating jobs. I thank all of you for being here.”

The innovation lab operates under current good manufacturing practices, regulatory guidelines and strict food manufacturing safety practices.

Aimutis said the lab turns a vision into a reality — a world-class building where plant-based foods can be researched, developed and turned into commercial products.

“And also helping new companies establish new products in the marketplace, and then the second objective was to bring value to some of the fruits and vegetables we have here in North Carolina,” Aimutis said.

The space, Aimutis said, will be used by “just about anybody” interested in producing food products, with the one requirement that any company would be focused on plant-based products.

The lab will offer a range of customizable services that include product research and development, pilot plant production, training and workshops, and establishing food companies.

The facility was made possible through a partnership among a number of organizations that support North Carolina’s food manufacturing economy, including the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, N.C. State University, the N.C. Department of Commerce, the Economic Development Partnership of North Carolina and the N.C. Research Campus.

Haley Burtch, Hawi Debilo and Miceala Hayes, graduate students with N.C. State’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, said they were excited about the ribbon-cutting.

“It was kind of cool to see people from the industry, legislature and professors. It’s awesome for us as students to see all of this come together,” Burtch said.

Ben Lepczyk said that through a partnership with the Food Innovation Lab, he is working to create a plant-based supplemental meal-replacement beverage for all ages.

“Me and my wife, Erika, came in with an idea to (Aimutis). He took us through the design process to get the creative juices flowing and to determine what kind of creative product we wanted to create,” Lepczyk said. “We are working right now on the branding and marketing strategy and the N.C. Food Innovation Lab is focused on product development.”

According to a news release from the food lab, North Carolina’s agriculture and agri-businesses account for $91.8 billion of the state’s annual gross domestic product.

“We are excited to have this facility open. We want to make the state of N.C. proud in what we’re doing here and we want to see economic growth as a result of this facility,” Aimutis said.

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Center for Environment hosts National Wildlife Refuge Association tour

2 of 2SALISBURY — The declining red wolf population, the impact of rising sea levels and the problem of feral hogs were of special interest to viewers of an online presentation held March 4 by officials from the National Wildlife Refuge Association.The event centered on the 11 National Wildlife Refuges in North Carolina and hosted by the Center for the Environment at Catawba College. Geoff Haskett, NWRA president, talked about the national organization, and Mike Bryant, NWRA regional representative for North and South Car...

2 of 2

SALISBURY — The declining red wolf population, the impact of rising sea levels and the problem of feral hogs were of special interest to viewers of an online presentation held March 4 by officials from the National Wildlife Refuge Association.

The event centered on the 11 National Wildlife Refuges in North Carolina and hosted by the Center for the Environment at Catawba College. Geoff Haskett, NWRA president, talked about the national organization, and Mike Bryant, NWRA regional representative for North and South Carolina, offered a virtual tour of the N.C. refuges, lands Bryant calls “hidden treasures.”

The National Park Service oversees 85 million acres of designated land that encompasses 62 parks which are managed for their historical and cultural value and natural preservation as well as for recreation, Haskett said.

The National Wildlife Refuge System, on the other hand, encompasses 855 million acres and 586 refuges, which are managed for wildlife and habitat conservation and the possible reintroduction of native fauna and flora. Recreation on these lands is secondary to conservation.

Bryant offered a virtual tour of the state’s refuges, beginning with the Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge about 100 miles west of Salisbury. Established in 2015, it currently has more than 7,225 acres, but only 24 of those are owned. The rest are in conservation easements. This refuge is home to the bog turtle. At 4 ½ inches, it is the smallest turtle in the country. The mountain sweet pitcher plant can also be found there. The refuge is not open to the public.

The Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge is located 56 miles south-southeast of Salisbury. Established in 1963 as a migratory bird sanctuary, it is notable for its thousands of wintering waterfowl and nesting wood ducks, which inhabit the area. The refuge is an example of one of the South’s rarest pine ecosystems, the wet Piedmont Longleaf Pine forest. Hunting, fishing and wildlife observation are permitted on the refuge.

Nine of N.C.’s National Wildlife Refuges are located in the northeastern coastal plain. The Roanoke River Refuge contains the largest intact, least disturbed hardwood forest ecosystem in the mid-Atlantic region. Its purpose is to protect and conserve these habitats for migratory birds, like the prothonotary warbler. It also provides spawning habitat for blueback herring and striped bass.

It has the largest inland breeding heron rookery in the state. “It’s also a great place to kayak,” Bryant said. The 110,000-acre Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is one of the largest refuges in the state. Pocosins are swamps on a hill.

“’Hill’ is a relative term when the highest ground is only 30 feet above sea level,” Bryant said. “It’s a broad, gently sloping dome of peat that drops in elevation one inch per mile.”

Groundwater from rain saturates these organic soils, except during seasonal dry spells and prolonged droughts when the soil dries and can catch fire and burn. A portion of the refuge is a migratory bird refuge where snow geese can be found in the winter. Deer and black bear are among the animals that live there.

The largest N.C. refuge, the 158,000-acre Alligator River Refuge, is located on its own sub-peninsula bounded by the Alligator River and Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds. The refuge surrounds a 46,000-acre Department of Defense bombing range.

“They don’t blow up things,” Bryant said. “They just practice dropping dummy bombs and shooting targets.”

Wildlife that benefit from the USFWS’s management of this refuge include American alligators, black bear, waterfowl like pintail ducks, and a wide variety of migratory birds, including the indigo bunting.

Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge, the second oldest N.C. refuge established in 1934, is home to the state’s largest natural lake, the 40,100-acre Lake Mattamuskeet. Wintering waterfowl from the Atlantic flyway (including 20-30 percent of green-winged teal, 40-80 percent of northern pintails and 25-35 percent of tundra swan, as well as others) winter on and around this refuge.

The oldest N.C. refuge, Swanquarter Refuge, was established in 1932 to conserve wetland habitat. Half the refuge is a national wilderness area. A variety of waterfowl, including American black ducks and canvasback ducks, can be found there.

The nearby Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge marsh harbors the threatened black rail, a small, sparrow-sized secretive marsh bird. This refuge is one of the last places the bird is found in North Carolina.

Mackay Island Refuge in the northeast corner of the state provides habitat for migratory birds. Waterfowl hunting is restricted in parts of this area. Currituck Refuge protects this coastal barrier island ecosystem for the birds, wildlife, fish and plants that depend on it.

Finally, Pea Island Refuge was established in 1938 to provide nesting, resting and wintering habitat for migratory birds and other wildlife. The refuge is the first 13 miles of Hatteras Island, beginning at Oregon Inlet. The habitat is home to a number of species, including redhead and ringneck ducks, the black-necked stilt, least terns and loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings, whose nests are protected and monitored.

Editorial: Can DuraFiber plant have new life?

Fiber Industries’ decision in 1963 to build a manufacturing plant in Rowan County was huge news. The company produced polyester fiber, and the country needed a lot of it. Fiber Industries tripled the size of the plant before it even opened. At one time, the company employed 3,000 people at the Salisbury facility.Now the gigantic plant that Fiber built may be headed for closure. Officials with DuraFiber Technologies announced Friday they were seeking a buyer, and they gave employees 60-day notice that their jobs...

Fiber Industries’ decision in 1963 to build a manufacturing plant in Rowan County was huge news. The company produced polyester fiber, and the country needed a lot of it. Fiber Industries tripled the size of the plant before it even opened. At one time, the company employed 3,000 people at the Salisbury facility.

Now the gigantic plant that Fiber built may be headed for closure. Officials with DuraFiber Technologies announced Friday they were seeking a buyer, and they gave employees 60-day notice that their jobs would likely end in September. Workers at DuraFiber plants in Shelby and Winnsboro, S.C., got the same news.

By this time, WARN notices and closing plans are all too familiar to people in Rowan County. DuraFiber’s announcement was different in that it contained an “if.” DuraFiber will idle its Carolina factories “if a buyer is not identified” by Sept. 11, officials said. DuraFiber seemed to be leaving the door ajar.

Economic development officials for the city, county and state should vigorously explore that opening. Perhaps there’s a way to bring in new opportunities. At stake are 373 jobs and the continued use of a factory on moe than 450 acres off U.S. 70, about six miles west of Salisbury. The spot was a prime location when Fiber chose it in the 1960s, and it still is desirable today.

Leaders of the North Carolina legislature have framed their agenda as a sure-fire way to boost the state’s economy — primarily by cutting corporate and personal income taxes. The voters of Rowan County have been loyal supporters of this conservative approach. However, whatever transformational power these tax cuts were supposed to have on job growth has yet to reach Rowan. In fact, virtually all the state’s rural counties have been left on the sidelines of the recovery and of former Gov. Pat McCrory’s so-called “Carolina Comeback.”

Things have changed at this site on U.S. 70 before. The former Fiber plant has also carried the brand of Hoescht Celanese, KOSA, Invista and Performance Fibers. There may be more. Former longtime employees gathered a year ago to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the plant’s 1966 opening. They had a lot to be proud of. In addition to their work producing tire yarn and staple fibers, they were leaders in United Way giving and other community causes. Thousands of Rowan residents worked at the plant some time in their lives — and thousands would like to again.

For many years, Fiber was the county’s largest taxpayer. A 1976 story in the Post said 10 companies accounted for 24 percent of county property tax revenues at the time. Sad to say, nearly every one of them is gone. Only Duke Energy still has a major presence.

So it goes. Expecting the roster of local companies to stay the same would be unrealistic. Besides, there have been many additions: Freightliner, Magna Composites, Agility Fuel Systems, Gildan Yarns, Integro and others.

Still, Rowan is due for a turnaround, and saving the DuraFiber jobs — or replacing them very quickly — is essential.

While most of the production in the United States is in Oklahoma and Texas, sesame is expanding in the Southeast.

John HartAt a GlanceEven the experts are a bit taken aback by the interest and excitement surrounding sesame as a new crop for the Southeast. They believe sesame can work for farmers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and other states, but they admit surprise on just how much sesame acreage will be planted across the Southeast this year.Driving the interest is strong and robust demand for sesame for such products as hummus, rolls and other baked products, including the famous sesame seed hamburger buns. Sesame ...

John Hart

At a Glance

Even the experts are a bit taken aback by the interest and excitement surrounding sesame as a new crop for the Southeast. They believe sesame can work for farmers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and other states, but they admit surprise on just how much sesame acreage will be planted across the Southeast this year.

Driving the interest is strong and robust demand for sesame for such products as hummus, rolls and other baked products, including the famous sesame seed hamburger buns. Sesame has gained a reputation as a health food of choice for many consumers. Essentially, sesame is a low-input, drought and heat tolerant crop that is grown mainly for its high oleic and linoleic acid seed.

And while most of the production in the United States is in Oklahoma and Texas, sesame is expanding in the Southeast.

Planting plans

Carl Coleman, a Dillon, S.C. seed dealer, estimates that more than 13,000 acres of sesame will be planted across the Southeast this year. He estimates roughly 7,000 acres will be planted in South Carolina, 4,000 acres in North Carolina, and 2,000 acres in Georgia. Coleman and his business partner Michael Benjamin have contracted the sesame acreage with Sesaco, a fully integrated sesame supply chain company headquartered in Austin, Texas.

Related:A little seed with potential in North Carolina

Coleman is bullish on the potential of sesame because he believes it checks most of the boxes of any crop currently grown in the Southeast. He says two years of small-plot research conducted by North Carolina State University shows that sesame is a good fit for the Southeast. The North Carolina research was conducted across four sites at the Piedmont Research Station in Salisbury; the Sandhills Research Station in Jackson Springs; the Horticultural Crops Research Station in Clinton; and the Tidewater Research Station in Plymouth.

“Certainly, plot information is not the same as on-farm, but it is an indicator,” Coleman said.

Because it is such a new crop, Coleman is encouraging first-time sesame growers to err on the side of caution. He wants farmers to feel extremely comfortable with the new crop moving forward.

“When you go into something new, you need to have the best attitude toward it because if you don’t, it’s really easy to let defeat get in the way. We always learn from defeat, but if you don’t have the right mindset, you can use that as an excuse not to do it versus using it as a learning process to move forward,” Coleman said.

As the North Carolina State University Extension alternative crops Extension specialist, David Suchoff is bullish on the future of sesame for North Carolina farmers. He believes it’s a good fit for the state.

At a new and emerging crops seminar sponsored by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services at the newly completed Steve Troxler Agricultural Sciences Center in Raleigh April 13, Suchoff highlighted the sesame research efforts conducted by his team and discussed efforts to get more sesame planted on North Carolina farms.

Thrives in heat

“Sesame originates in sub-Saharan Africa, so it likes it hot. It is fully mechanized, so if a farmer already has equipment to grow and harvest small grains they can handle sesame, with either a drill or planter to plant it and a combine to harvest it,” Suchoff said.

He noted that sesame requires relatively low inputs and is considered one of the most drought tolerant crops out there. It also doesn’t require a whole lot of inputs when it comes to fertility.

In research efforts at N.C. State, Suchoff and his colleagues and a team of graduate students are conducting a variety of trials, including nitrogen rate and fertility trial trials, row spacing trials, and other tests. And because sesame is considered resistant to the troublesome root knot nematode, they are also conducting nematode trials as well.

One clear take away from the research is that planting sesame is both challenging and incredibly important. While sesame is a very small seed, it must be planted deep, which goes against conventional wisdom.

“We always learned big seed plant it deep, small seed plant it shallow, and that is not the case with sesame. Sesame has to be planted deep. It’s not necessarily about depth. It’s about planting into moisture. What we learned about sesame is it needs to sit in moisture for about three days. If it’s in a layer of moisture and it dries up on that second day, the seed dies. It needs to have moisture those three days. We learned this the hard way in the sense that we replanted all of our trials in 2021,” Suchoff said.

Suchoff is advising sesame farmers not to just set their drill to plant at an inch deep. He is encouraging them to go to their field, dig into the soil and find that layer of moisture then set their drill to go about a quarter of an inch into that moisture.

“Your end depth may be an inch; it may be an inch and a half. If you do not get the depth correct, it’s not coming up,” Suchoff cautioned.

Suchoff said once sesame gets past that phase, it’s a tough crop that doesn’t really need a lot of inputs. Also, early in the season, sesame is a slow growth crop. For the first three weeks, sesame isn’t going to do a whole lot.

“It is not a competitive crop. It’s not going to outcompete weeds. If you let your weeds get away from you, you’re going to lose this crop. Unlike hemp (another new crop Suchoff is working with), there are some labels registered for sesame, but there are not a lot. If you want to plant this crop, you need to get your planting correct in terms of planting deep and understand that you may need to replant the crop. Second, keep it as clean as possible,” Suchoff said.

An indeterminant crop

Suchoff said it is important to remember that sesame is an indeterminant crop and will continue to produce flowers until it dies. He said what is important about sesame being indeterminant is that North Carolina farmers will need to kill their sesame crop.

“In Texas and Oklahoma, they can rely on a frost. Here not so much. That’s where we need to use a harvest aid to kill the crop and dry it down so we can go in and harvest it with a combine,” Suchoff emphasized.

In the meantime, Jared Johnson, general manager of the production division at Sesaco, is optimistic about the future of sesame and sees even further growth potential across the Southeast.

“The sesame market is strong. It continues to grow. There is a tremendous amount of growth in the U.S. We’re extremely hungry for sesame. We’re going to continue to be hungry for sesame,” Johnson said.

He believes demand for sesame will continue to expand due to a shift in consumer eating habits to healthier foods and shift in demographics across the United States. He said growth in Asian and Middle Eastern population is driving much of the demand because sesame is a big component of their diets.

“Sesame is a good source of fat, protein, and healthy oils,” he said.

Read more about:

Sesame

About the Author(s)

John Hart

Associate Editor, Southeast Farm Press

John Hart is associate editor of Southeast Farm Press, responsible for coverage in the Carolinas and Virginia. He is based in Raleigh, N.C.

Prior to joining Southeast Farm Press, John was director of news services for the American Farm Bureau Federation in Washington, D.C. He also has experience as an energy journalist. For nine years, John was the owner, editor and publisher of The Rice World, a monthly publication serving the U.S. rice industry. John also worked in public relations for the USA Rice Council in Houston, Texas and the Cotton Board in Memphis, Tenn. He also has experience as a farm and general assignments reporter for the Monroe, La. News-Star.

John is a native of Lake Charles, La. and is a graduate of the LSU School of Journalism in Baton Rouge. At LSU, he served on the staff of The Daily Reveille.

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