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Homes for Sale in The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC

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Buying or selling a home is a big deal. When it comes to making one of the largest financial decisions in your life, it's crucial to have a trusted advisor by your side. Someone who does what is best for you and your family, listens to your needs and does everything possible to help you achieve your goals. While most home buyers and sellers crave the same guidance from their real estate professionals, their specific real estate needs will always be different.

If you have been looking for a real estate agent who understands the delicate balance between the two, look no further than Hillary Jones. With more than 15 years of real estate experience under her belt, Hillary brings a unique set of client-centric skills to the table. Unlike some big box firms out there, Hillary provides personalized, one-on-one real estate services to all her clients. This boutique approach lets Hillary spend more time with clients, whether it's giving a house tour or finding the hidden gem of their dreams.

Hillary takes pride in knowing The Ponds, SC neighborhoods like the back of her hand, from new homes for sale in The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC to secluded riverfront properties off the beaten path. She will work closely with you to discover the exact type of home you're interested in buying while always considering your budget.

Why do so many home buyers trust Hillary? She knows that the most important real estate transaction is yours. As such, she works tirelessly to exceed expectations.

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Here are just a few more reasons why real estate clients trust Hillary Jones:

  • 15+ Years of Real Estate Experience
  • Always Working for Your Best Interests
  • Expert Negotiator
  • Loyal, Confident, and Capable
  • Always Accessible Via Email or Phone
  • Always Up to Date on Market Trends and What They Mean to You
  • Expert at Writing Strong, Enforceable Contracts
  • Well Connected
  • Access to Many Homes for Sale in Dozens of Neighborhoods
  • Stress-Free Service: You've Got Enough on Your Plate!
  • Available Every Step of the Way, Even After Closing
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Peaceful Living

Community designers chose to focus on a peaceful community atmosphere when creating this neighborhood. Homes are not stacked on top of one another but are also close enough to create a sense of community. Here, residents live, work, play, and gather while never being too far away from major thoroughfares. The neighborhood's layout helps reduce on-road traffic, encouraging alternative methods of travel like walking and biking.

The community plan sidewalks and beautiful spaces for residents to enjoy, creating meaningful ties to Mother Nature. With gorgeous walking and biking trails nearby, residents have the chance to enjoy natural features without having to travel to a national park.

If living close to nature in a community-based environment sounds like the perfect place to live, The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC should be high on your list.

Schools

 First Time Home Buyer The Ponds, SC

Schooling is important to the residents of Summerville, SC, with the community being close to many of the area's highest-ranking K-12 schools. If you have younger children, you will love the local education system and pre-K options for younger kids. Local high schools are also great, and feature many course options with purpose-driven curriculums and over-achieving teachers. During your tour of this The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC, be sure to ask Hillary Jones about the elementary, middle, and high school options for learning.

Crime Rate

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Crime is always a factor no matter where you live, but if you're concerned about criminal activity in this The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC, you don't have much to worry about. Recent statistics show that Summerville, SC has lower crime rates than other cities in South Carolina. That is great news if you're looking to buy a home in the next year, especially if you have younger children. If you're looking for a peaceful place to live with excellent nearby schools and lower than average crime rates, look no further than this popular neighborhood in Summerville, SC.

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Homes for Sale The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC

The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC is a well-established neighborhood nestled in Summerville, SC - one of the most popular cities to live and play in in South Carolina. After spending some time in this gorgeous community, you will get a true sense of comfort and belonging here. You get the feeling that everything is well looked after and that residents are happy - because both are true.

in The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC was designed to give residents access to everything they could want or need without driving all over Summerville, SC. Located a short driving distance from the highway, The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC features unique recreation opportunities, shopping, top-ranked schools, and even healthcare, all within driving distance of the neighborhood. Community developers created the layout of this neighborhood in Summerville, SC with convenience and comfort in mind. When you live here, you can enjoy an abundance of trees, shrubs, walking trails, well-lit streets, and more.

A few reasons why home buyers put The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC at the top of their lists include:

The Trail System

Designed for families and their children to get outside and play, in Summerville, SC trail system winds its way throughout the neighborhood, giving residents an easy way to get out and get exercise. Kids love to explore these trails, and parents love to let them get a break from sitting in front of their iPad all day. Adults enjoy the trails too, and use them for walking with friends, running, or simply meandering through The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC.

Sense of Community

The The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC designers wanted to give residents plenty of room to "stretch out" while also creating a palpable sense of community. So, you won't have to walk a mile in the snow to get a cup of sugar from your neighbor. On the other hand, residents and their lots are well-spaced apart, maintaining privacy. Residents in the The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC neighborhood are close-knit, and very welcoming to new homeowners. If you have children, you should set up a date and time to tour The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC with Hillary Jones, who can point out popular features and home plans.

Summerville, SC YMCA

One of the most sought-after amenities Summerville, SC is the family YMCA. This massive complex was created to give local residents a fun, easy way to enjoy recreation with friends and family. Features include modern exercise equipment, walking tracks, tennis and basketball courts, a softball field, an aquatics complex, and even wellness and health programs. Sign your child up for Summerville, SC camp, or even try learning a new sport to keep you active on the weekends!

Healthcare

Healthcare

Access to healthcare options in Summerville, SC is plentiful and located within a few miles' drive. Healthcare providers include:

  • Primary Care Options
  • Orthodontic Practices
  • Family Dentistry Offices
  • Chiropractic and Massage Therapists
  • Assisted Living Facilities
  • Eye Care Centers

Shopping

Shopping

One of the biggest reasons why so many home buyers settle on Summerville, SC is the extensive access to shops and services, all located just a short drive from the neighborhood.

Shopping and convenience options include:

  • Popular grocery store chains
  • Restaurants offering breakfast, lunch, and dinner options from names like Starbucks and Chick-Fil-A, and more.
  • Gas stations and convenience stores for re-fueling and quick snacks.
  • Personal services like nail salons and spas for relaxation.
  • Financial services for taxes and investing.
  • Preschool and childcare options for families.

Real Estate
in The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC

Awarded "Best Community" by Summerville, SC Choice Awards, The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC is located where 53,000 acres of land have been placed under density restriction. If you're looking for a neighborhood with a secluded feel that is close to nature but also nearby the conveniences of modern life, you're in luck. The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC offers restaurants, shops, and entertainment options nearby, and should be on your list of communities to tour with Hillary Jones. Unlike many newer neighborhoods, The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC does not have a "cookie cutter" feel at all. Instead of congested sidewalks and small lots, The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC boasts plenty of room to live and a variety of floor plan options.

Homebuyers choose The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC for many reasons, including:

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1.

Family-Friendly

One of the most cited reasons for moving to The Ponds neighborhood in Summerville, SC is the fact that it is family friendly. Here, kids love to gather outdoors and play, socialize, and make new friends that last for a lifetime. This neighborhood's family-friendly atmosphere makes carpooling easy, especially if your kids are in children's programs with neighbors. Expect warm smiles and hearty hugs when you move here, as the current residents are very friendly and welcoming. If you don't currently have kids but want to start a family in the future, this neighborhood in Summerville, SC is a fantastic place to raise a child.

 Listing Agent The Ponds, SC

2.

Outdoor Activities

If you love to soak up the sun and spend your free time in the great outdoors instead of cooped up inside, this neighborhood in Summerville, SC is a great choice. Whether you want an easy-to-find walking trail for a leisurely stroll a wooded hiking trail, you can find plenty of options close by. If you would rather hit the gym over walking or running, you can choose from several gyms in the local area. If you don't feel like driving a short way's away, you can always take a nice walk around this gorgeous neighborhood in Summerville, SC. When you live here, you will have easy access to many outdoor activities, all within a short driving distance.

Some local outdoor activity options include:

  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Walking
  • Fishing
  • Swimming
  • Camping
  • More
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3.

Schools

Perhaps the most cited reason for buying a home in Summerville, SC is the unique access to schools. Whether your child is just getting started in the school system or is a junior in high school, the education programs in Summerville, SC are excellent. Ranked among some of the best schools in the state, there are options for pre-K students all the way up to high schoolers. Students that attend school in Summerville, SC love the teachers, their fellow students, the classes offered, and the after-school activities to advance their sports skills and education.

Many parents choose to enroll their kids in the Dorchester 2 school district, which has received acclaim as one of the best school districts available.

 Buyers Home Seller The Ponds, SC

Find Your Forever Home
with Hillary Jones

If you are thinking about buying real estate in Summerville, SC, we would like to invite you to our office and welcome you to our community. As a local for nearly two decades, Hillary Jones knows the Lowcountry like the back of her hand. From local market knowledge to contract negotiations, Hillary is committed to unmatched real estate excellence. It doesn't matter if you have a few questions or are ready to buy your dream home - if quality real estate service is what you need, you will find it here.

Everyone knows the home buying process can be challenging, but as your advocate, your experience will be seamless and stress-free. Give our office in Summerville, SC, a call today to learn more about how Hillary puts the "real" back in real estate.

Homes-for-Sale-phone-number 843-709-4666

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Latest News in The Ponds, SC

‘Gatorcicles’ popping up in South Carolina as ponds freeze, stunning photos show

Even alligators need to take some time to chill.Videos of so-called “gatorcicles” in South Carolina have gone viral on social media this week, as temperatures across the state plummeted into the teens.About ten impressive 9-foot-long cold-blooded creatures were seen frozen in ice, with only their snouts sticking out of the shallow ponds of The Swamp Park, an all...

Even alligators need to take some time to chill.

Videos of so-called “gatorcicles” in South Carolina have gone viral on social media this week, as temperatures across the state plummeted into the teens.

About ten impressive 9-foot-long cold-blooded creatures were seen frozen in ice, with only their snouts sticking out of the shallow ponds of The Swamp Park, an alligator sanctuary about 175 miles south of Raleigh.

But don’t worry, the predators might look dead, but they’re simply avoiding the winter chill.

“We have the alligators doing what they do — doing an amazing job at protecting themselves by sticking their noses up out of the water in the evening, allowing for the water to freeze around themselves, but still allowing themselves the ability to breathe,” park manager George Howard said in a video shared Sunday.

The “gatorcicles” — as another employee put it — can stay frozen solid for as long as necessary to stick out the cold weather, which hit South Carolina last week and lasted through the weekend.

The alligators instinctively know when the weather will drop and prepare by jutting their nose above the surface and suspending their body in the water.

When the water freezes the next day, passersby would only see snouts and really big teeth sticking out.

“Think of it as a cute little danger snorkel,” the employee said.

The incredible evolutionary technique is known as brumation, which is the reptilian equivalent of mammal hibernation, according to the South Carolina Aquarium.

Unlike mammals, alligators don’t fall into a deep slumber, but slow down their metabolic rate and become lethargic with some periods of activity.

While they don’t eat in the winter months, the gators continue to drink.

The alligators shake off their sleep and return to their favorite pastime — basking in the sun — on the warmer days in winter.

The phenomena is not limited to South Carolina, but anywhere alligators frequent that has experienced a drop in temperatures.

Texas, which experienced snowfall last week, also has its fair share of gatorcicles popping up in its waters.

“We bundle up but this is what the American alligator does,” Eddie Hanhart said on TikTok.

“See he knew he was gonna freeze last night, so what he does is he went and found him a nice comfy spot.”

Goodbye turf grass: HOA embraces native plants for their gnarly roots

MOUNT PLEASANT — When James McKee became president of his community’s homeowners association three years ago, he did it for the stormwater ponds.The 13 ponds in Seaside Farms provide protection against flooding by storing excess stormwater, but McKee was surprised to learn that their main function is to clean the water.“Fertilizer, debris and sediment get trapped in the silt in the bottom of the pond,” McKee said, adding that this sequestration is important because the ponds connect to larger waterways....

MOUNT PLEASANT — When James McKee became president of his community’s homeowners association three years ago, he did it for the stormwater ponds.

The 13 ponds in Seaside Farms provide protection against flooding by storing excess stormwater, but McKee was surprised to learn that their main function is to clean the water.

“Fertilizer, debris and sediment get trapped in the silt in the bottom of the pond,” McKee said, adding that this sequestration is important because the ponds connect to larger waterways.

“The final stormwater pond (drains into) the marsh,” he said.

Although depth assessments of the ponds showed dredging wasn't necessary, they did reveal other alarming news: The pond edges were caving in and quickly. McKee knew the HOA needed to choose environmentally-conscious landscaping practices over traditional ones.

Native plants with deep root systems provide clear benefits that grass can't deliver. The plants plow their circuitous roots deep into the soil, helping to stabilize it. They absorb more rainfall, filter pollutants and provide habitat for insects, birds and other creatures.

Such initiatives also can have aesthetic advantages, adding a range of color and texture to a landscape — something a manicured lawn can't do.

If the HOA did nothing to address the erosion, the dirt around the edges of the ponds would slip in. Eventually, the community would have no choice but to dredge — and dredging is expensive.

“Estimates that I heard from a former HOA board president was $1 million for one pond,” McKee said. For 13 ponds, this price tag would be enormous, and the HOA hadn’t saved enough to cover it, McKee added.

Instead, McKee and the board decided to plant native flowers and grasses along the pond edges to slow erosion. Native plants would stabilize the shoreline, maintain water quality and provide habitat for wildlife and pollinators, including egrets, heron, turtles, ducks and dragonflies.

To get homeowners on board with the plan, the HOA board regularly communicated updates and held workshops with Robinson Design Engineers to educate the residents.

“Some of the loudest skeptics and critics have turned into vocal proponents through this process,” said Joshua Robinson, engineer and owner of Robinson Design Engineers.

Over the next 10 years, McKee said the community aims to plant 7,000 linear feet of native plants along the pond edges. The Shoreline Restoration Group planted 2,600 feet of native plants in 2023, and currently is working on planting another 1,200 feet.

The project has cost roughly $350,000 to date — considerably cheaper than dredging. And by spending money now to save the edges, the HOA is saving money in the long-run, McKee said.

“It’s like going to the dentist,” he said.

It’s about the roots

Typical of most residential neighborhoods, turf grass dominates the landscape in Seaside Farms. Robinson and McKee estimated that, of the 6 miles of shoreline around the 13 ponds, 80 percent was turf grass to the edge at the start of the project.

These turf lawns achieve the clean-cut look many neighborhoods value but don't provide functional benefits to homeowners and the environment around them.

“The problem with grass is it’s got a really tiny root system,” McKee said.

To prove it, Zack Snipes, co-owner of Shoreline Restoration Groups, took a few of the native plants his crew would be planting that morning out of their pots: alligator flag, Dixie iris, Virginia iris and soft rush.

Although these plants were only a few months old, their roots already were webbed and tangled, vastly exceeding that of the turf grass that had been growing for decades.

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“If we had waited another month, we’d have to literally cut these pots off because the roots are so gnarly,” Snipes said.

These gnarly root systems are what will keep the pond edges stable, holding the soil together and cleaning the water. But like all plants, they need the chance to grow.

To give the young native plants at the pond’s edge a fighting chance, McKee said the HOA stopped mowing to the edge of the ponds. It has also relaxed regulations on shrub heights on HOA-owned and private property.

“We used to, as an HOA, require homeowners to cut (shrubs) down to four feet, so it would look good,” McKee said. “What we didn’t know was that we were having a negative impact on the (plants’) growth.”

Now, the HOA board is encouraging homeowners to keep plants healthy, which could mean not trimming them.

“We're okay if they trim them down a bit, but if they also want to let them (grow), we're not going to go after them,” he said.

Some HOAs in the area have rejected native plants, saying they look "messy and unkempt" compared to mowed turf grass.

“We did have to tell (homeowners) … it's going to look wild,” he said of the native plants.

Rising Waters

Seaside Farms is prioritizing the most erosive areas first, and some homeowners say they’re waiting patiently for their turn. Phyllis Nelson, a Seaside Farms resident since 2001, has watched erosion eat away at the nearby pond bank, noting how her yard has become spongier as a result.

She’s worried about the water coming up to the house and encroaching on the roots of her beloved Satsuma orange tree planted close to the edge.

She pointed across the pond to where Snipes’ crew had smoothed the bank into a gradual slope and laid biodegradable coir matting and logs to support the young native plants until their roots take over.

“That’s beautiful,” she said.

Mini wetlands

Usually, McKee sees only one or two pelicans in the ponds in the spring, and they never stay long. But this spring he’s seen dozens, as well as turtles, egrets, new species of ducks and many more dragonflies than usual.

What Caused the Mysterious Carolina Bays?

When the Wright Brothers gave us the engine-powered airplane in the early 20th century, they didn't just give us a new way to get around. Flight also gave us an entirely different perspective on the things around us (or the things below us). From above, people became tiny specs and fields looked like brown and green squares tilled together like a quilt. And before long, on the East Coast of the U.S., pilots began noticing something even more interesting.What we once thought were just simple isolated ...

When the Wright Brothers gave us the engine-powered airplane in the early 20th century, they didn't just give us a new way to get around. Flight also gave us an entirely different perspective on the things around us (or the things below us). From above, people became tiny specs and fields looked like brown and green squares tilled together like a quilt. And before long, on the East Coast of the U.S., pilots began noticing something even more interesting.

What we once thought were just simple isolated ponds and wetlands along the Atlantic coast, began to be seen as a pattern of thousands of egg-shaped depressions that were oriented exactly the same way. From above, it almost looks like a giant from outer space sneezed all the way from Florida to New Jersey leaving shallow depressions in his wake.

The origins of these depressions is still a scientific mystery today, but these ponds are as important to the landscape now as they were millions of years ago.

The native Algonquins called these shallow depressions pocosins, but they are more commonly referred to as Carolina Bays because of the large number of these water pockets along the coast of North and South Carolina.

"Carolina Bay is the name given to most any wetland along the eastern Coastal Plain that has an elliptical shape and is often isolated from other bodies of water, such as small streams or rivers," says Kyle Barrett, associate professor of wildlife conservation at Clemson University in South Carolina. "Carolina Bays occur in low spots in the landscape, and because they typically only fill up from precipitation, they may dry out during the hot and dry portions of the year."

"Because the elliptical Carolina Bays are almost always oriented along a northwest to a southeast axis, and because they can be really concentrated on the landscape, it was suggested in the 1950s that a meteor shower formed all the Carolina Bays," Barrett says. To discover the true origins of the unusual formations, scientists took to carbon dating.

"There have been studies that use radiocarbon dating of buried organic sediments or other techniques to estimate their age," says Barrett. Turns out, Carolina Bays were not all formed at the same time. Some were formed tens of thousands of years apart. "Some wetlands are estimated to be over 100,000 years old, whereas others may 'only' be 15,000 years old or less."

This age difference led scientists to believe the bays were not caused by a meteor shower since they would be around the same age.

"There isn't any support for this [meteor shower] idea, since they don't have the same origin date, and no material has been found in the soil to suggest extraterrestrial formation," Barrett explains. So no, the Carolina Bays don't outline an otherworldly message, and scientists have not found remnants of space matter, to the chagrin of UFO theorists.

The next best hypothesis, while less cryptic, is the most likely answer: wind.

It's suggested that during the late Pleistocene period (2.5 million years ago), very strong southwesterly winds on ponds caused currents. Those currents washed against the southwest and northwest sides of ponds and resulted in sediment deposits on the northeast and southeast sides. Over time, they formed what we now know as the Carolina Bays.

At one point, there may have been as many as 200,000 Carolina Bays, but researchers say that nearly 97 percent of Carolina Bays have been impacted by agriculture and logging. Human impact hasn't just erased a piece of our geological past, it's also disrupted a delicate ecosystem of marshes that are important to many wetland species like salamanders and frogs in North America.

"Carolina Bays, along with other types of isolated wetlands, offer a wide range of environmental benefits. Many insects and amphibians are particularly abundant in these wetlands since Carolina Bays are without fish most of the time," Barrett explains. "Even 'terrestrial' species, such as birds and bats, are more abundant in patches of forest containing a Carolina Bay than equal-sized forested areas without one."

Wetlands, like the Carolina Bays, are also essential in preventing flooding and improving water quality, too. "Water quality is particularly important since many bays occur in agricultural areas where fertilizers and herbicides may be common," Barrett points out.

Unfortunately, many bays have been repurposed for human use like farmlands, the development of homes or businesses, or expanded into ponds. Any wetlands that aren't near a permanent stream or river, Barrett says, aren't protected by the Clean Water Act (CWA). This is because protecting thousands of small wetlands is a burden to landowners.

"For this reason, if you look at aerial imagery (on Google Maps, for example), you'll see loads of elliptical shapes along the coast of the Carolinas that used to be wetlands, but are now filled in for agriculture," says Barrett. The result is that wildlife takes on the burden of wetland loss.

However, Barrett suggests an expanded interpretation of the CWA could protect important wetland locations. "I don't know that every isolated wetland needs to be federally protected — that seems like it could create an unreasonable burden for many landowners. But I do think a broader interpretation of the CWA would help save many important isolated wetlands. States could also enact protections that better address local issues related to wetland loss."

Carolina Bays are just one example of Earth's natural mysteries that are important elements of our North American ecosystem. When land is filled in for pasture or crops, it doesn't just take away important habitat's wetland species; it also disrupts a balance of water flux and natural flooding protections, which is bad for our homes and livelihoods, too.

Furthermore, Barrett reminds us that without these wetland habitats, we miss out on some of the most biologically varied ecosystems in North America. "Many people don't have an opportunity to see the incredible amphibian and reptile diversity we have in the Southeast," he says. "But these wetlands, along with others in the region, are an incredibly important home to these species. Visiting these wetlands can open your eyes (and ears when the frogs are calling) to some of the underappreciated gems of the eastern U.S."

One rare species that inhabits the Carolina Bays is 25 different types of carnivorous plants. The Carolinas are the only places where these insect-eating plants, like the sundew and pitcher plant, grow naturally.

A clash in Lake Wylie. Widen SC 557 or protect a local pond? What leaders have decided

A road widening plan has led to two decades of debates because there’s a pond in the way. And now county leaders seem to have taken a stand.The most recent months of debate led to a decision Monday night by York County Council to endorse its previous plan for S.C. 557 in Lake Wylie. Council passed a proclamation in favor of the planned road design. The proclamation is needed to satisfy South Carolina Department of Transportation concerns so permits can be issue...

A road widening plan has led to two decades of debates because there’s a pond in the way. And now county leaders seem to have taken a stand.

The most recent months of debate led to a decision Monday night by York County Council to endorse its previous plan for S.C. 557 in Lake Wylie. Council passed a proclamation in favor of the planned road design. The proclamation is needed to satisfy South Carolina Department of Transportation concerns so permits can be issued on the state road.

The two-mile Pennies for Progress project at, and heading west from, the Three Points intersection of S.C. 557, 274 and 49 will widen S.C. 557 to five lanes.

At the center of the discussion is whether the county should stick with the planned road design, which would cut through a publicly-owned pond.

“There simply is no other viable alternative that doesn’t present a host of downsides that we can’t predict,” said Council Chairwoman Christi Cox, who voted to keep the initial design.

Christy Hall, state transportation secretary with SCDOT, outlined work with county officials since early 2021 on options for the road, which Hall said included an offer to evaluate alternatives at no cost to the county.

“We’re not saying don’t build the project,” Hall said. “We do support the widening of 557. The question is, what is the defined details? How are you going to do it? Not should you do it.

“We feel like we’ve been trying to be good partners with you, but we’ve also been stuck in the middle between the warring factions on this particular issue.”

In 2003, York County voters passed the second Pennies for Progress sales tax referendum to improve York County roads.

The plan then was to widen S.C. 557 near Three Points to three lanes. Plans changed by the next Pennies vote in 2011, when voters approved a widening to five lanes.

York County residents vote to renew Pennies for Progress funding every seven years.

The 2011 referendum budgeted about $4.3 for the widening from S.C. 49 to Kingsburry Road. The current project estimate is $25 million. The full five-lane stretch was fully funded as of the Pennies vote in 2017. It took almost three years to buy right-of-way.

In 2019 the county spent about $550,000 to buy 11 acres of a property, which included payment for damages since the road would mean the loss of a pond and relocation of a gate. Two years later a tax board in Lake Wylie set up for land preservation bought the larger site, which is now Woodend Farm. That land has been preserved as a public park.

Hall said she was contacted about the widening work in early 2021 and has had varied correspondence with county officials. Alternative routes, or the process to identify potential ones, have been discussed.

SCDOT issued construction permits last September but rescinded them in April. Reinstatement of those permits this summer came on condition the county would approve the proclamation that went forward Monday night.

David Hudspeth, county manager, said Monday night the county remains confident the earlier design is the best option.

“We feel like the alignment has been fully vetted over the years,” Hudspeth said. “Further study will result in unnecessary delays and additional cost for the project.”

Councilwoman Allison Love represents the Lake Wylie area where the road will go. Love wants to look at options to reroute the road and keep the pond.

“Road plans have changed for less,” Love said.

Love says it might take $500,000 or more to move the pond to another area on Woodend, and she doubts the county would pay for that. Love said a $1 million from a conservation bank was awarded to the Woodend project based on environmental factors, to go with the more than $4 million tax district purchase.

However, other council members point to the roughly $5 million already spent on the S.C. 557 widening and the two decades of public clamoring for work there.

“This project has been sitting for 20 years,” said Councilman William “Bump” Roddey. “Kind of shameful it’s taken this long to get there, but we’re following through on our commitment to do it.”

Roddey said he sees a greater cost in delaying road work.

“I don’t think we lose anything if we move the pond,” Roddey said. “We actually save time. We save money, if we move the pond. The property still will have a pond, it just won’t be in the exact same location.”

Councilman Tom Audette said the cost to pave roads has more than doubled in two years. So waiting unnecessarily on a project doesn’t make sense.

“The cost impact has been brutal on all of our projects,” Audette said.

Council members say it’s unusual to have purchased property from a landowner for right-of-way, then have another public body buy the whole property. Councilman Tommy Adkins said running the road through what is now a public park isn’t ideal, but he sees an issue of fairness.

“I don’t want it to show, just because that’s become a park and all, that we treat any of that any different than we do our normal citizens,” Adkins said.

Councilman Watts Huckabee said there are streams on either side of S.C. 557 and a house that’s eligible for historic property designation. They all make alignment changes unlikely, he said. The county could double what it’s already spent to wait and look at more options, he said, only to find other routes aren’t feasible.

Huckabee also said the Lake Wylie tax board bought the Woodend property after road officials bought right-of-way, so both groups knew of plans to drain the pond.

“Really the pond was never an issue, I don’t think,” Huckabee said. “I apologize to people that thought it was, but I don’t think it was.”

The county push to move forward with a project approved three times already in a 20-year span comes amid ongoing work to create the next Pennies road list. A citizens commission continues to form a list of roads that, pending council approval in full, would appear on the November 2024 ballot to continue the cent sales tax.

803-329-4076

John Marks graduated from Furman University in 2004 and joined the Herald in 2005. He covers community growth, municipalities, transportation and education mainly in York County and Lancaster County. The Fort Mill native earned dozens of South Carolina Press Association awards and multiple McClatchy President’s Awards for news coverage in Fort Mill and Lake Wylie.

3-year-old vanishes from apartment before being found at bottom of pond, SC cops say

A 3-year-old vanished from an apartment complex before being found at the bottom of a retention pond, South Carolina officials said.The toddler was pulled from the water with “no signs of life” and was pronounced dead at the scene, according to the Dorchester County sheriff’s and coroner’s offices.The child was identified in a news release as John Tyheem Williams Jr.Deputies said they responded to a report of a missing toddler at about noon on Friday, Sept. 8. The child was last seen at an apartme...

A 3-year-old vanished from an apartment complex before being found at the bottom of a retention pond, South Carolina officials said.

The toddler was pulled from the water with “no signs of life” and was pronounced dead at the scene, according to the Dorchester County sheriff’s and coroner’s offices.

The child was identified in a news release as John Tyheem Williams Jr.

Deputies said they responded to a report of a missing toddler at about noon on Friday, Sept. 8. The child was last seen at an apartment complex in the Ladson area, roughly 20 miles northwest of Charleston.

A deputy reported that someone found an iPod in a retention pond that might have belonged to the 3-year-old. Then, the sheriff’s office started working with other agencies to search the water for the missing child, according to an incident report.

At about 1 p.m., a diver found the child “approximately 15-20 feet from the bank in about 10-12 feet of water.” The toddler’s body was taken to the coroner’s office, where an autopsy was scheduled, according to officials.

Deputies in a Sept. 8 email said they were investigating the child’s apparent drowning death along with the coroner’s office and the S.C. Law Enforcement Division.

At least 4,000 people die from drowning every year in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and drowning is a leading cause of death for children.

Some factors can make drowning more likely, including not knowing how to swim, a lack of close supervision, not wearing a life jacket and drinking alcohol while recreating near or in water.

The National Drowning Prevention Alliance said there are tips to help keep you safe in the water, including checking local weather conditions, never swimming alone and choosing the right equipment.

“Don’t hesitate to get out of the water if something doesn’t feel right,” the group said on its website. “Whether it’s that the current is getting rough, rain has started to fall, or your body is just not responding like you would like it to due to fatigue or muscle cramps, then just leave and return to the water another day. It’s always a good thing to trust your instincts.”

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June 05, 2023 11:53 AM

This story was originally published September 11, 2023, 9:12 AM.

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