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Homes for Sale in Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC

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Buying or selling a home is a big deal. When it comes to making one of the largest financial decisions in your life, it's crucial to have a trusted advisor by your side. Someone who does what is best for you and your family, listens to your needs and does everything possible to help you achieve your goals. While most home buyers and sellers crave the same guidance from their real estate professionals, their specific real estate needs will always be different.

If you have been looking for a real estate agent who understands the delicate balance between the two, look no further than Hillary Jones. With more than 15 years of real estate experience under her belt, Hillary brings a unique set of client-centric skills to the table. Unlike some big box firms out there, Hillary provides personalized, one-on-one real estate services to all her clients. This boutique approach lets Hillary spend more time with clients, whether it's giving a house tour or finding the hidden gem of their dreams.

Hillary takes pride in knowing Summers Corner, SC neighborhoods like the back of her hand, from new homes for sale in Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC to secluded riverfront properties off the beaten path. She will work closely with you to discover the exact type of home you're interested in buying while always considering your budget.

Why do so many home buyers trust Hillary? She knows that the most important real estate transaction is yours. As such, she works tirelessly to exceed expectations.

Buy A Home Summers Corner, SC

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Here are just a few more reasons why real estate clients trust Hillary Jones:

  • 15+ Years of Real Estate Experience
  • Always Working for Your Best Interests
  • Expert Negotiator
  • Loyal, Confident, and Capable
  • Always Accessible Via Email or Phone
  • Always Up to Date on Market Trends and What They Mean to You
  • Expert at Writing Strong, Enforceable Contracts
  • Well Connected
  • Access to Many Homes for Sale in Dozens of Neighborhoods
  • Stress-Free Service: You've Got Enough on Your Plate!
  • Available Every Step of the Way, Even After Closing
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 Buying Agent Summers Corner, SC

Peaceful Living

Community designers chose to focus on a peaceful community atmosphere when creating this neighborhood. Homes are not stacked on top of one another but are also close enough to create a sense of community. Here, residents live, work, play, and gather while never being too far away from major thoroughfares. The neighborhood's layout helps reduce on-road traffic, encouraging alternative methods of travel like walking and biking.

The community plan sidewalks and beautiful spaces for residents to enjoy, creating meaningful ties to Mother Nature. With gorgeous walking and biking trails nearby, residents have the chance to enjoy natural features without having to travel to a national park.

If living close to nature in a community-based environment sounds like the perfect place to live, Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC should be high on your list.

Schools

 First Time Home Buyer Summers Corner, SC

Schooling is important to the residents of Summerville, SC, with the community being close to many of the area's highest-ranking K-12 schools. If you have younger children, you will love the local education system and pre-K options for younger kids. Local high schools are also great, and feature many course options with purpose-driven curriculums and over-achieving teachers. During your tour of this Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC, be sure to ask Hillary Jones about the elementary, middle, and high school options for learning.

Crime Rate

 Real Estate Agent Summers Corner, SC

Crime is always a factor no matter where you live, but if you're concerned about criminal activity in this Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC, you don't have much to worry about. Recent statistics show that Summerville, SC has lower crime rates than other cities in South Carolina. That is great news if you're looking to buy a home in the next year, especially if you have younger children. If you're looking for a peaceful place to live with excellent nearby schools and lower than average crime rates, look no further than this popular neighborhood in Summerville, SC.

 Sell My Home Summers Corner, SC

Homes for Sale Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC

Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC is a well-established neighborhood nestled in Summerville, SC - one of the most popular cities to live and play in in South Carolina. After spending some time in this gorgeous community, you will get a true sense of comfort and belonging here. You get the feeling that everything is well looked after and that residents are happy - because both are true.

in Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC was designed to give residents access to everything they could want or need without driving all over Summerville, SC. Located a short driving distance from the highway, Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC features unique recreation opportunities, shopping, top-ranked schools, and even healthcare, all within driving distance of the neighborhood. Community developers created the layout of this neighborhood in Summerville, SC with convenience and comfort in mind. When you live here, you can enjoy an abundance of trees, shrubs, walking trails, well-lit streets, and more.

A few reasons why home buyers put Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC at the top of their lists include:

The Trail System

Designed for families and their children to get outside and play, in Summerville, SC trail system winds its way throughout the neighborhood, giving residents an easy way to get out and get exercise. Kids love to explore these trails, and parents love to let them get a break from sitting in front of their iPad all day. Adults enjoy the trails too, and use them for walking with friends, running, or simply meandering through Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC.

Sense of Community

The Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC designers wanted to give residents plenty of room to "stretch out" while also creating a palpable sense of community. So, you won't have to walk a mile in the snow to get a cup of sugar from your neighbor. On the other hand, residents and their lots are well-spaced apart, maintaining privacy. Residents in the Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC neighborhood are close-knit, and very welcoming to new homeowners. If you have children, you should set up a date and time to tour Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC with Hillary Jones, who can point out popular features and home plans.

Summerville, SC YMCA

One of the most sought-after amenities Summerville, SC is the family YMCA. This massive complex was created to give local residents a fun, easy way to enjoy recreation with friends and family. Features include modern exercise equipment, walking tracks, tennis and basketball courts, a softball field, an aquatics complex, and even wellness and health programs. Sign your child up for Summerville, SC camp, or even try learning a new sport to keep you active on the weekends!

Healthcare

Healthcare

Access to healthcare options in Summerville, SC is plentiful and located within a few miles' drive. Healthcare providers include:

  • Primary Care Options
  • Orthodontic Practices
  • Family Dentistry Offices
  • Chiropractic and Massage Therapists
  • Assisted Living Facilities
  • Eye Care Centers

Shopping

Shopping

One of the biggest reasons why so many home buyers settle on Summerville, SC is the extensive access to shops and services, all located just a short drive from the neighborhood.

Shopping and convenience options include:

  • Popular grocery store chains
  • Restaurants offering breakfast, lunch, and dinner options from names like Starbucks and Chick-Fil-A, and more.
  • Gas stations and convenience stores for re-fueling and quick snacks.
  • Personal services like nail salons and spas for relaxation.
  • Financial services for taxes and investing.
  • Preschool and childcare options for families.

Real Estate
in Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC

Awarded "Best Community" by Summerville, SC Choice Awards, Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC is located where 53,000 acres of land have been placed under density restriction. If you're looking for a neighborhood with a secluded feel that is close to nature but also nearby the conveniences of modern life, you're in luck. Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC offers restaurants, shops, and entertainment options nearby, and should be on your list of communities to tour with Hillary Jones. Unlike many newer neighborhoods, Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC does not have a "cookie cutter" feel at all. Instead of congested sidewalks and small lots, Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC boasts plenty of room to live and a variety of floor plan options.

Homebuyers choose Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC for many reasons, including:

 Foreclosure Summers Corner, SC

1.

Family-Friendly

One of the most cited reasons for moving to Summers Corner neighborhood in Summerville, SC is the fact that it is family friendly. Here, kids love to gather outdoors and play, socialize, and make new friends that last for a lifetime. This neighborhood's family-friendly atmosphere makes carpooling easy, especially if your kids are in children's programs with neighbors. Expect warm smiles and hearty hugs when you move here, as the current residents are very friendly and welcoming. If you don't currently have kids but want to start a family in the future, this neighborhood in Summerville, SC is a fantastic place to raise a child.

 Listing Agent Summers Corner, SC

2.

Outdoor Activities

If you love to soak up the sun and spend your free time in the great outdoors instead of cooped up inside, this neighborhood in Summerville, SC is a great choice. Whether you want an easy-to-find walking trail for a leisurely stroll a wooded hiking trail, you can find plenty of options close by. If you would rather hit the gym over walking or running, you can choose from several gyms in the local area. If you don't feel like driving a short way's away, you can always take a nice walk around this gorgeous neighborhood in Summerville, SC. When you live here, you will have easy access to many outdoor activities, all within a short driving distance.

Some local outdoor activity options include:

  • Hiking
  • Biking
  • Walking
  • Fishing
  • Swimming
  • Camping
  • More
Buy A Home Summers Corner, SC

3.

Schools

Perhaps the most cited reason for buying a home in Summerville, SC is the unique access to schools. Whether your child is just getting started in the school system or is a junior in high school, the education programs in Summerville, SC are excellent. Ranked among some of the best schools in the state, there are options for pre-K students all the way up to high schoolers. Students that attend school in Summerville, SC love the teachers, their fellow students, the classes offered, and the after-school activities to advance their sports skills and education.

Many parents choose to enroll their kids in the Dorchester 2 school district, which has received acclaim as one of the best school districts available.

 Buyers Home Seller Summers Corner, SC

Find Your Forever Home
with Hillary Jones

If you are thinking about buying real estate in Summerville, SC, we would like to invite you to our office and welcome you to our community. As a local for nearly two decades, Hillary Jones knows the Lowcountry like the back of her hand. From local market knowledge to contract negotiations, Hillary is committed to unmatched real estate excellence. It doesn't matter if you have a few questions or are ready to buy your dream home - if quality real estate service is what you need, you will find it here.

Everyone knows the home buying process can be challenging, but as your advocate, your experience will be seamless and stress-free. Give our office in Summerville, SC, a call today to learn more about how Hillary puts the "real" back in real estate.

Homes-for-Sale-phone-number 843-709-4666

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Latest News in Summers Corner, SC

BACK TO SCHOOL: DD2 says goodbye to historic Rollings Middle School building, Hello to new one

SUMMERVILLE, SC (WCBD) – Dorchester District Two received the green light to move in the new Rollings Middle School of the Arts building in Summerville.Students and staff will begin the 2018-2019 school year on Monday, August 20th.The new school is located in Summers Corner on S.C. 61. According to the Rollings Middle School of the Arts Facebook page, state inspectors approved the building nearly two weeks out from the first day of school.News 2’s Laura Smith had the chance to sit down with Principal Patrick ...

SUMMERVILLE, SC (WCBD) – Dorchester District Two received the green light to move in the new Rollings Middle School of the Arts building in Summerville.

Students and staff will begin the 2018-2019 school year on Monday, August 20th.

The new school is located in Summers Corner on S.C. 61. According to the Rollings Middle School of the Arts Facebook page, state inspectors approved the building nearly two weeks out from the first day of school.

News 2’s Laura Smith had the chance to sit down with Principal Patrick Pye before the move happened at the historic building downtown Summerville.

The 1924 building has served kids for nearly 100 years. It will be turned into office space for Dorchester District Two.

Pye says it needs a lot of work and will look completely different when renovations wrap up.

“It’s kind of like grandmas house. You walk down the halls and you see they’re quite narrow, there’s no lockers, there’s no running water in science labs. It’s not built for the 21st century learner,” said Rollings Middle School of the Arts principal, Patrick Pye.

The new Rollings will come with wider hallways, lockers, larger classrooms, and a major auditorium upgrade for performances.

Pye says it will be the largest in Dorchester County and is capable of seating 1,100 people.

“Not only will we be able to do all of our performances and events, the district can use that facility as well as the community,” said Pye.

Students must audition for an art to attend Rollings. The district will add 60 students each year until enrollment reaches 850.

What students and parents should know:

1) New Bus Routes

2) New Bell Schedule

3) New Building Tour – Sunday, August 19th.

Rollings Middle School of the Arts will be on the high school bell schedule. School will start at 8:55 a.m. and dismiss at 3:55 p.m.

Sixth grade meet the teacher is now scheduled to happen on Wednesday, September 5th.

Seventh and eighth grades meet the teacher is Tuesday, September 11th.

Summers Corner residents asking for federal help after mail mishaps

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - People living in the Summers Corner development are reaching out to representatives and federal post office officials for help with persistent mail delivery issues.Packages delivered a few days late or a letter arriving a few houses down aren’t the only problems plaguing those who live in the Summers Corner development.Christy Hurley has lived in Summers Corner since 2022. She says she understands a few weeks of understaffing and a misplaced item occasionally, but her service has been inconsiste...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - People living in the Summers Corner development are reaching out to representatives and federal post office officials for help with persistent mail delivery issues.

Packages delivered a few days late or a letter arriving a few houses down aren’t the only problems plaguing those who live in the Summers Corner development.

Christy Hurley has lived in Summers Corner since 2022. She says she understands a few weeks of understaffing and a misplaced item occasionally, but her service has been inconsistent for a year.

“We started noticing certain things missing such as debit cards, credit cards, we would have to call those companies and say can you just send a new one? That’s when I started to get nervous because that’s personal information,” Hurley says.

Talking with neighbors, a few people thought it seemed like a community-wide issue. Damone Walsh is one of the residents who helped create a tracking system to get a sense of what is going on.

Over a 90-day period, people living in Summers Corner contributed to a neighborhood-wide spreadsheet tracking mail mishaps. They range from missing tax documents and cards with money, to empty packages left in mailboxes. Their recordings found about 100 issues.

“Frankly, we were surprised. I mean over just during that 90 days, 78 days of actual mail service, at least one to two people were having mail problems every day, every single day and just in our community,” Walsh says.

The spreadsheet creators believe their numbers may be underreported as well. The neighbors sent letters to South Carolina representatives Graham, Scott, Mace and Clyburn, as well as the U.S. Postal Inspection Service and Inspector General.

“It just makes us think that there’s something systemic as opposed to individual problems. I mean, it may be both, but ultimately, I mean, let’s, let’s get it fixed,” Walsh says.

Walsh and Hurley say the postal service will often respond to an individual complaint, citing they are understaffed, or contractors are doing the deliveries.

“Everybody expected and was willing to accept if it’s a couple days off, well, that just makes sense. There’s a lag between whenever they scan it and whenever they deliver it, but then it went on for days, weeks and then just never just never delivered,” Walsh says.

Hurley says she’s gotten to the point that she doesn’t trust the service when it comes to important deliveries.

“We just sent out notices for my college daughter’s graduation and I had to inform all of our family. I said, Look, we’re having so many issues, I would prefer you not send money, gift cards, anything like that in the mail,” she says. “We got a graduation announcement for my sister and the back was torn open. And I said this is getting a little crazy.”

Walsh says the group decided to reach out to their representatives because USPS is a federal service, they need help getting answers from.

“We have a right to expect mail service. It’s embodied in our in our laws. And several people have reached out to the Postal Inspector and the postmaster and complained repeatedly and got nothing, just no result,” Walsh says.

Representative Nancy Mace’s office provided the following response to the community letter:

We’ve gotten a few inquires about this post office and have talked with our postal contact in Columbia. Their response has been that a lot of post offices, including this one, are experiencing staffing shortages and significant slowdowns. They are looking into it though so I’ll add in your inquiry to the others we’ve sent – will help us build the investigative case against them so the PS will have evidence to help find solutions to the issues.

Senator Lindsay Graham’s office also responded asking for more information from Walsh, who submitted the letter.

“We all recognize and believe that most of the Postal Service employees, they just want to do a good job, but it just makes us think that there’s something systemic as opposed to individual problems. I mean, it may be both, but ultimately, let’s get it fixed,” Walsh says. “I think consistent delivery, and I think a component would also be responsiveness from the leadership from within the Postal Service is what we’re looking for.”

The United States Postal Service provided the following statement:

The Postal Service strives is working hard to provide the best possible service to our valued customers. We apologize for any mail services issues that may have been experienced by customers living in the Summer’s Corner community. Some of the proactive steps we’ve taken in Summerville, SC include hiring additional personnel, as well as making staffing adjustments. Local management at the Oakbrook Post Office will continue to work with customers in Summer’s Corner to ensure every effort is being made to meet or exceed their expectations. We urge any customers with concerns or questions about their mail delivery service to contact the Postal Service immediately so that we can look into and resolve those concerns promptly. Customers have a variety of options for contacting the Postal Service, including contacting their local Post Office, calling 1-800-ASK-USPS (1-800-275-8777), or visiting our website.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

STATE OF THE DISTRICT: Robbins talks about ways to handle growth

Managing growth was an essential and recurring topic during the Dorchester School District Two State of the District address Friday, Feb. 2, at the Summer Corner Performing Arts Center.DD2 Board of Trustees Chair Dr. Ashley Wimberly told the crowd that growth is good but has presented some challenges.“The definition of growth is the process of increasing in size or development. Some synonyms are advancement, expansion, gain and improvement, all words that bring a positive connotation,” she said. “And yet the i...

Managing growth was an essential and recurring topic during the Dorchester School District Two State of the District address Friday, Feb. 2, at the Summer Corner Performing Arts Center.

DD2 Board of Trustees Chair Dr. Ashley Wimberly told the crowd that growth is good but has presented some challenges.

“The definition of growth is the process of increasing in size or development. Some synonyms are advancement, expansion, gain and improvement, all words that bring a positive connotation,” she said. “And yet the issue of growth for us is certainly a difficult one. It is creating some challenges and anxiety about how we will manage the consequences.”

Wimberly said there is some fear surrounding the funding for the changes needed to accommodate the growth DD2 is experiencing. Still, she urged people to also look at the good that comes with growth and the idea that physical growth, just as personal growth, can lead to remarkable things.

“Research shows we often judge normal human experiences that come with growth, like nervousness, stress and discomfort, too harshly,” she said. “While our inclination might be to avoid them, we can become better people and live a richer life if we embrace them. The physical growth we’re facing comes with challenges, just as any other type of growth does. Navigating it will require effort, determination and the willingness to step out of our comfort zones. It may also involve facing setbacks, making mistakes and experiencing temporary failures. But it is through these challenges that we grow the most; as the saying goes, in the middle of difficulty lies opportunity.”

Facts and Figures: Dorchester School District 2

DD2 Superintendent Dr. Shane Robbins said managing the district’s growth has been, is and will be difficult. He said Sand Hill Elementary and Beech Hill Elementary are at 125% capacity because of the new housing construction in those areas.

“In Dorchester County alone, over a 10-year forecast, over 10,000 (housing) units are on the books to be built,” Robbins said. “Now, lots of things can happen that could change that forecast. But what I’m seeing from the state level is that South Carolina is the No. 1 fastest-growing state in the United States right now, and the Lowcountry is the fastest-growing area in South Carolina.”

Robbins discussed four ways to address enrollment growth, from the fastest and least expensive to the longest and most costly: rezoning, learning cottages, brick-and-mortar classroom additions and new construction.

“The first three options, we need to do most of that internally with our own budget to some degree,” Robbins said. “The fourth option must be voter-approved as a referendum.”

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The rezoning option involves moving areas where children go to a school that is at or over capacity to a school that is not at or over capacity.

“This may increase drive times for some people,” Robbins said. “Because of the way Dorchester County is developed, it could actually mean shorter drive times for some people. But rezoning is our first option, and it has no costs.”

The second option is installing learning cottages.

“I say learning cottages, and that’s just a fancy word for trailers,” Robbins said. That option takes about 12 to 18 months because the cottages have to be ADA-compliant, and we have to run utilities to them.

The third option, brick-and-mortar additions onto existing buildings, could take up to 24 months and is more expensive than adding the learning cottages. The fourth option, new construction, could take up to 36 months, depending on the design and permitting processes and whether land is available.

“New construction is something we cannot do as a district. We cannot afford that, and we do not have the revenue for that,” Robbins said. “This one requires a referendum by the voters. There is no state funding for school districts in South Carolina other than for those that are consolidating.”

The option for DD2 is the district’s 8% tax rate authority, meaning the tax rate of 8% can be raised at any time without approval request to maintain buildings. Robbins said the money can also be used for technology or infrastructure upgrades.

“We maintain more than 30 buildings in the district,” Robbins said, including 25 school buildings, the district office, the transportation depot, the community learning center, and the alternative school.

Robbins said the district has access to a couple of small tax-increment financing (TIF) funds, but a referendum may be the best way to get funding.

“We haven’t had a major referendum in Dorchester District Two for 12 years,” Robbins said. “That is why we are in a very good position to possibly ask the voters for that and to help us with our growth issues.”

More than $12K raised for Apel family who lost Summers Corner home in fire

More than $12K raised for Apel family who lost Summers Corner home in fire. (GoFundMe)DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — Last week, a fire devastated the Apel family's home in the Summers Corner community.A...

More than $12K raised for Apel family who lost Summers Corner home in fire. (GoFundMe)

DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCIV) — Last week, a fire devastated the Apel family's home in the Summers Corner community.

AGoFundMe was quickly started to support the Apel family and in just a few hours, the $5,000 goal had already been reached.

Yet people continued to donate and in 24 hours? The fund had reached about $11,000.

Read More: Flames envelop home in Summers Corner community of Dorchester County

As of Monday morning, donations were just over $12,530, with people still actively donating.

The GoFundMe states the money will help the family replace all that was lost in the house fire and support them until they reestablish a new home.

The photo used on the page shows two adults and four children.

Read More: Dozens give back in North Charleston on Easter Sunday

Flames could be seen shooting out of the kitchen of the home on Gnarly Oak lane at around 5 p.m. Friday.

The homeowner said the fire started on the porch of the home and quickly spread. Fire officials said the cause was an apparent electrical issue.

Everyone home at the time was able to escape without injury.

12 new grocery stores coming to Charleston to feed growth-hungry suburban markets

As the Charleston area continues to grow and attract more residents, so does the need for food and the vendors who provide it.No fewer than 12 new grocery stores are in the works ...

As the Charleston area continues to grow and attract more residents, so does the need for food and the vendors who provide it.

No fewer than 12 new grocery stores are in the works across the Lowcountry, including plans to tear down and replace one store on site and relocate two others.

Around Charleston, the population boom — now expanding at an average net daily rate of 36 residents, according to the latest update — keeps fueling competition among supermarket chains that are angling to be as close as possible to the proliferating housing enclaves that keep their cash registers ringing.

That's about 13,300 new residents each year spread across Charleston, Berkeley and Dorchester counties, with many of the newcomers settling on the fringes of the growing region, especially in large-scale developments in Goose Creek, Moncks Corner and Summerville.

The three counties saw a 20 percent population surge over the past decade to a combined 830,000 residents, according to the Charleston Regional Development Alliance.

Competing grocery chains closely analyze the numbers to decide where to set up shop.

By one measure, a general rule for a full-service supermarket of 40,000 square feet or more to be viable is to have 10,000 residents, or about 4,000 rooftops, within a 20-mile radius. If there's competition in the market, the required number of residents is higher and vice versa for an area with no rivals.

Berkeley bound

Near Summerville, North Carolina-based Harris Teeter and competitor Publix of Florida are building stores on Nexton Parkway, across the street from one another, to serve the developing 5,000-acre Nexton community, eventually home to nearly 19,000 residents.

Both are set to be completed this year in the Berkeley County development, with Harris Teeter set to open in the spring and Publix likely welcoming customers by mid-year, according to Nexton spokeswoman Cassie Cataline.

On the opposite side of Nexton, Lowes Foods of North Carolina plans to build a new supermarket on North Creek Drive, across the street from the Cane Bay development.

It will anchor a retail center on the corner near fast-food restaurant McDonald's. Look for an opening possibly in 2025, according to property owner and Charleston businessman Eddie Buck.

A little farther to the east, Publix also plans to anchor a corner shopping center at U.S. Highways 176 and 17A in Carnes Crossroads, a 2,300-acre mixed-use housing development that could accommodate about 11,000 residents at full buildout. Like Lowes Foods, it is expected to open in 2025, according to a Publix spokesman.

Cartload of competition

Southwest of Summerville, another Publix could begin construction in 2025, based on bidding documents last fall that show a 51,454-square-foot store slated for a 10-acre site on Beech Hill Road, across from the planned 8,000-home Summers Corner community.

The 7,200-acre mixed-use community with schools and shops has about 1,200 homes sold and another 250 under construction, according to Jason Byham, division president at Lennar, the homebuilder that bought the tract for more than $26 million in 2018.

In Mount Pleasant, three new grocery stores are in the works.

The Fresh Market of North Carolina plans to take over the 26,000-square-foot site discount grocer Lidl abandoned before moving in at Bowman Place Shopping Center at Bowman Road and Johnnie Dodds Boulevard.

The Greensboro-based grocer took over the remainder of the 15-year tenant agreement Lidl signed three years ago with the option for 15 additional years, according to a document filed in the Charleston County land records office.

Fresh Market has not announced an opening timeframe.

Business

On the northern end of the East Cooper town of nearly 100,000 people, discount grocer Aldi leased several acres at U.S. Highway 17 and KOA Campgrounds Road for a second Mount Pleasant location.

Aldi plans to build a 23,000-square-foot store on the land next to South Morgans Point Road after signing a lease last spring for 20 years with the option to renew up to 25 years. Construction has not begun, and the no-frills grocer has not announced a projected opening timeframe.

Also in the works is a new Trader Joe's. The California-based, German-owned chain recently confirmed its plans to open a second store in Mount Pleasant. The site was not announced, but the grocer is looking at part of the former Bi-Lo supermarket site in Sweetgrass Corner Shopping Center near Highway 17 and the Isle of Palms connector.

On James Island, German-owned Aldi recently leased 22,000 square feet in the former Bi-Lo supermarket on Folly Road.

Retail

The company's seventh Lowcountry store will sit next to Planet Fitness and likely open in 2025 "if not earlier," according to Mark Hoffman, director of development for New Jersey-based Garden Communities, which has owned the 4.5-acre retail center since 1994.

Building bigger

Three existing supermarkets are set to be replaced.

On Daniel Island, Publix wants to demolish its longtime store on Seven Farms Drive and build a 50,472-square-foot store and pocket park it in its place in the same location, according to plans presented to the city.

The new construction will replace the existing 29,618-square-foot supermarket that was built in 2002 as the only grocery store allowed on Daniel Island under an agreement with the developer of the master-planned community.

Construction likely won't start until 2025, and it will take 12-18 months to build the new store, according to Publix spokesman Jared Glover.

The grocer hasn't announced interim plans for shoppers while the replacement is being built. The nearest option for shoppers is across the Wando River — a Harris Teeter five miles away on Long Point Road in Mount Pleasant. Publix has another store about 7 miles north in the Point Hope development off Clements Ferry Road.

In West Ashley, plans are making their way through the city review process to relocate Publix from a free-standing building at Ashley Landing Shopping Center to a newly constructed site on the eastern side of the main retail center where Big Lots and Dollar Tree currently operate.

The property owner has not projected a relocation timeframe, and the future of the current Publix site has not been determined.

Finally, plans are in the works to build a new Harris Teeter supermarket up to 65,000 square feet on part of a 50-acre parcel adjacent to Freshfields Village Shopping Center between Kiawah and Seabrook islands.

The larger grocery store will replace the existing site in Freshfields. It's part of a planned 160,000-square-foot retail center that will connect to Freshfields off Kiawah Island Parkway.

The new supermarket probably won't materialize until 2027 as plans are still to be finalized, according to Chris Corrada, a principal with the development firm Riverstone Properties of Richmond, Va., which owns the parcel to be developed.

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